Funding

  

Research Development Fund. Integrating Biometric Responses to the Social Sciences.

2016 Amount $1,200,000

Dual PI’s: M. Palma; S. Woltering

Provides funds to purchase high-end Polysomnograph (PSG: EEG, respiration and cardiovascular measures, etc...) to measure sleep quality. These funds will be the start of a research program that will systematically investigate the role of sleep quality on learning and health.

Supports: TBD

 


  

CEHD Catapult Grant. Waking Up! Becoming Leaders in Sleep Research for Better Health and Learning.

2016 Amount $40,000

PI’s: S. Woltering; N. Deutz

Provides funds to purchase high-end Polysomnograph (PSG: EEG, respiration and cardiovascular measures, etc...) to measure sleep quality. These funds will be the start of a research program that will systematically investigate the role of sleep quality on learning and health.

Supports: Facilities, Sleep Project

 


  

Program to Enhance Scholarly and Creative Activities (PESCA) Grant Program. Working Towards a Bio-Behavioral Center: Cyberlearning and Research Infrastructure Support.

2015-2016 Amount $25,000

PI’s: S. Woltering; R. Gutierrez-Osuna; S. Pedersen.

Supports the establishment of the neurobiological lab. Funds were awarded to purchase equipment for future research using psychophysiology (heart rate, skin conductance, etc…) and the development of online learning modules specific to neuroscience and psychophysiology in our lab. This support will greatly enhance learning experiences for students and enable research in psychophysiology.

Supports: Cyberlearning Project, Facilities 


  

Transforming Lives Grant. Neural Markers of Adolescent Obesity.

2015-2017 Amount: $30,000

PI’s: S. Woltering; S. Fields; J. Liew.

Provides start up funds to conduct research investigating neural markers for poor impulse control in obese adolescents. This is an internal TAMU grant in collaboration with the Health Behavior Research Group (HBRG) clinic in Bryan/College Station. Neural markers for impulsivity may assist in the clinical characterization, inform treatment plans, and lead to target neural systems for pharmaceutical intervention.

Supports: Obesity Project